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Little help
#11
(01-31-2019, 11:00 AM)blackbruin Wrote: I am from pa as well and went in blind to Virginia for muzzleloader buck and bear.  I only hunt the mountains in pa so really not much different, a little warmer, timing of rut etc a little behind pa.  I mainly hunt 4d in pa, a little 4e.

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I hunt 4c and 4e. I previously rifle hunted Augusta County in mid-Nov.. A (3) day hunt on the National Forest. I did notice the rutting activity was pretty heavy at that time. Brother in-law and I both connected on bucks the last day as they chased doe.
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#12
(01-31-2019, 01:12 PM)Carcass Wrote:
(01-31-2019, 10:56 AM)buckman4c Wrote: The area in Southern Va I'll be hunting over Thanksgiving week permits dog hunting. I'm used to "deer drives" in Pa but they involve humans pushing the deer. Is the effect generally the same or do the dogs run the deer pretty hard from start to finish?? What I'm looking for here is, if I set up in thick cover will the deer tend to slow up to provide a decent shot or they pretty much high tailing the whole way?

deer run like rabbits do, just on a larger scale.  dogs chase by scent, not sight.  the deer run away fast when jumped and then slow up and stop to see if the dogs are still chasing them.  they'll stay in and move thru thick vegetation to stay hidden.  a pursuing dog will keep bumping the deer ahead over and over until the deer is killed by a hunter or the dog loses the scent trail.  get in those thick areas and watch the deer sneak around trying to avoid the pursuing dogs.  i've been in a tree stand above really thick cover and seen multiple dogs chasing a deer that was only 20 yards away from them but they couldn't see him from the ground and he just kept circling around the base of my tree.  sometimes the dogs get confused by the deer scent and will run the trail backwards too (back tracking).  frequently, the dogs will jump a herd of deer and chase after the does while the buck sneaks away undetected--keep your eyes open.

Thanks for the good feedback.
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#13
(01-31-2019, 02:24 PM)Gravelneck100 Wrote: In southeast VA deer will go straight to water if they can.  This buck came by me being run by the dogs in the first video.  10 minutes later he came back by me after swimming down the main run which you might be able to see in the second video.  In the third video he is coming back across his original track and using the water to confuse the dogs.  It worked.  This is repeated over and over again, especially with larger bucks.  You just need some waders and a tree stand and you can get you a good chance at some nice bucks if you have access to some big swamplands.

Cool video. Thanks for the feedback. Looks like a dynamite stand set-up to me.
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#14
Part of me believes all problems with animals are due to pollution and destruction of their natural habitat: http://allfurloveanimalsociety.org/ This can't be a coincindence that this weird virus is on the rise when the pollution levels are sky high. Someone told me that pollution creates its own ecosystem instead of a natural one; the one where pests (who carry viruses) thrive... If we'll protect our natural reserves then we can expect a healthy population for years to come.
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#15
(01-31-2019, 10:56 AM)buckman4c Wrote: Hello all,

I'm new to the forum and will be deer hunting some new area in Virginia this year. I'm from Pa and experienced with hunting high ridge country. I don't have much experience with hunting agricultural areas or in areas with dogs. 

The area in Southern Va I'll be hunting over Thanksgiving week permits dog hunting. I'm used to "deer drives" in Pa but they involve humans pushing the deer. Is the effect generally the same or do the dogs run the deer pretty hard from start to finish?? What I'm looking for here is, if I set up in thick cover will the deer tend to slow up to provide a decent shot or they pretty much high tailing the whole way?

I'll share with you some observations from a guy that hunts with a club running dogs.  It's a sample of one.  How other clubs operate is an unknown.  Maybe that's the challenge - to learn how people use dogs to hunt in the area where you are going.

In the regular deer season, on what we call organized hunt days (first week, last week, every Saturday, and Thanksgiving Thursday and Friday if not in the "first" week), we NEVER get out the door to head to assigned stands before 7:15.  The dogs rarely ever run before 8 am.  Before we are ever afield and as we move into our stands seems like an opportunity for a still hunter.  We've trained deer to start sneaking out of the areas we are going to hunt!  They know!  We know, but we keep doing it the same way anyhow!  Resistance to change I guess.

The same thing happens in reverse at noon as we leave the field for lunch.  And then it plays out again in the early afternoon.  Normally, we are out of the dog hunt by 4 pm.  As sunset draws near, some of the chased deer are cautiously making way back to where they got bumped.  Opportunity, opportunity, opportunity!

The aerial image below has dog tracks overlain on it.  It's one afternoon of hunting.  Different color dots represent different dogs.  Each dot is a dog location at a moment in time.  Sometimes the GPS receives a location, other times not.  My question, then is - do you want to be in the middle of this or somewhere off on a edge. I'm not sure it always happens this way, but on this day they run a really tight perimeter.

If you hunt an ag area in the dog running season I'd guess your best bet would be to setup anywhere other than a field-edge.  Once dogs start running I never see nor do my trail cams see a deer in an open area in anything but darkness.  Just my two-cents....

The area, here, is about a square mile - 640 acres.


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#16
(04-05-2019, 10:42 AM)Kikylea Wrote: Part of me believes all problems with animals are due to pollution and destruction of their natural habitat: http://allfurloveanimalsociety.org/ This can't be a coincindence that this weird virus is on the rise when the pollution levels are sky high. Someone told me that pollution creates its own ecosystem instead of a natural one; the one where pests (who carry viruses) thrive... If we'll protect our natural reserves then we can expect a healthy population for years to come.


Whooo hoo - out there! Stop putting cannabis smoke into the atmosphere and you may be ok!


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Big Bucks are easy - Thats why I shoot little ones!
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#17
Norrydan some good details there. I agree with a hardcore hunter sneaking in earlier to get set on some escape trails.

New to VA this year so never was allowed deer hunting with dogs, would like to try sometime.
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#18
Norrydan,
Awesome post! By far the most informative I've seen since I started asking on this forum and that for North Carolina about hunting with dogs. Thanks for including the map.
I've been "aerial" scouting over maps from home trying to figure out how "I" would probably set up hunters and dogs for an effective hunt so I could then plan accordingly. This post spells it out for me!! Huge benefit!!
Thanks again!
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