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Rocket Stoves
#1
In Korea there is some downtime right now because of the Super Bowl and the lunar new year holiday. That means a lot of youtube viewing.

Rocket stoves are something that I find to be an interesting outdoor piece of equipment that can make a camp site’s or backyard cooking space easy to set up. I am seeing a few that are very basic cinder block or red brick setups to more elaborate welded angle iron ones with casters and fold out side tables.

In your opinion, is this better than just a fire pit because of portability and size, or is it just a fad and maybe they will go by the wayside after a few uses?
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#2
Yes.  they are interesting.  Never got around to building one.

Recently have interest in center-draft kerosene lamps and heaters.  Similar concept to the rocket stove, but with a tubular wick that suck up air in the middle and a glass "chimney designed to compress the airflow at combustion.  Results in a bright and hot flame that burns efficiently.

Been cleaning up my 30 year old Kero-Sun Moonlighter stove - which follows the same concept as an early 19th century Rayo center draft lantern... only safer and can be used to cook on.  Only thing I do not like is the luggability of it.

Rather than throw out the old wick, I might rig something up out of old soup cans and a steel floor post flange to make a more portable kerosene blind heater/cooker when I'm fishing on cold days.
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#3
Would love to see your product- when I get back I’ll be clearing some space for a few outdoor projects and a rocket stove will be one that my son can get in on.
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You went full diabetes... Never go full diabetes.
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#4
Simplest rocket stove design I saw from a guy at the World Health Org published maybe 10 years ago.

Uses a rectangular cooking oil can, like the ones used in many third world countries... so it is easily obtained.

Fit a metal L-shaped gutter downspout into it. Top is where you get the heat from, the bottom is where you feed your fuel.

In the voids, fill with wood ash for insulation.

Optional, put a cooking grate on top. Simple cheap, easy to make.

Most cooking oil these days come in plastic jugs here in the states. You might still find big metal cans of oil or soy sauce at the bigger asian groceries.... Great Wall, H-Mart, Lotte, etc.

Lots of fancier designs on youtube, using old ammo cans and such. With fancy doors and draft controls and liquid fuel feeds, etc.
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#5
Original rocket stoves (I believe) where made from a stump or section of log.
Hole down the middle to about 1/4 way from the bottom, then a feeder hole in from the side.
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#6
This method is how i usually burn stumps out; i think that a rocket stove with an air gap which draws air in and allows the fuel to be fed into the combustion chamber topped with a good chimney will allow for constant heat, and even higher temps with more airflow. Top if off with a small flat surface will prevent rain or water from getting into the chimney; and will act like a griddle. Some folks prefer a grill type surface.

Some examples i have seen direct the use of high temp or crack resistant cement. Also, letting the cement stoves cure for the better part of a month will reduce separation or cracking.
[Image: gallardo.jpg]
You went full diabetes... Never go full diabetes.
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